Long before Orlando became the theme park capital of the world, Lockheed Martin decided to open a complex in Orlando to support America’s space race. Its presence has grown ever since. With more than 7,000 employees located in Orlando, Lockheed Martin continues its commitment to our community through partnerships with education, dedication to STEM programs for students at every level, and projects to expand its footprint that support our workforce.

In celebration of Marillyn A. Hewson’s recognition as Chief Executive Magazine’s 2018 Chief Executive of the Year, we take a look back on 60 years of history between Lockheed Martin and the Central Florida community.

See below some of the significant milestones in the Lockheed Martin and Orlando history.

Lockheed Martin builds new R&D facility in Orlando

2018

As defense contract competition intensifies in the U.S., Lockheed Martin is making the decision to invest in increased research and development (R&D) by building a new 255,000-square-foot R&D facility. The expansion will bring a projected 500 new high-wage jobs in Orlando. Read more.

Lockheed Martin issues $2M grant for STEM education

2015

Lockheed Martin issues a $2 million, multi-year grant to support the expansion of college and career-focused science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs for Orange County Public Schools. Through the grant, 40 local schools offer the STEM curriculum through Project Lead The Way, a provider of K-12 STEM programs.

STEM education

New Innovation Demonstration Center opens in Orlando

2015

Lockheed Martin’s Innovation Demonstration Center (IDC) showcases advanced simulation technologies highlighting air, ground and next generation training and logistics capabilities. The 20,000 square-foot IDC resides within Lockheed Martin’s Training and Logistics Solutions facility near the University of Central Florida (UCF).

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Lockheed Martin Innovation Center in Orlando.

Marillyn A. Hewson becomes President and Chief Executive Officer

2013

Marillyn A. Hewson is Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Lockheed Martin Corporation. She previously held a variety of increasingly responsible executive positions with the Corporation, including President and Chief Operating Officer and Executive Vice President of Lockheed Martin’s Electronic Systems business area.

CLEAR program first becomes operational at Orlando International Airport

2005

Lockheed Martin made the Clear “registered traveler” program operational for the first time ever nationwide at Orlando International Airport in 2005, allowing passengers to move quickly through airport security using biometrics like eye scans and fingerprints.

Lockheed Corp. and Martin Marietta merge

1995

On March 15, 1995, Lockheed Corp. and Martin Marietta officially united what were then the second and third largest American defense contractors to form Lockheed Martin Corp. The instant synergy of the partnership led to stunning advances in the air, on land, in space, and in cyberspace and paved the way for Lockheed Martin to become the largest provider of IT services, systems integration, and training to the U.S. government.

Lockheed Martin MFC

First monorail cars manufactured by Lockheed Martin

1970s

Lockheed Martin’s heritage company, Martin Marietta, manufactured Walt Disney World’s first monorail cars at the company’s west Orlando facility on Sand Lake Road.


Ocala Operations founded

1970

Martin Marietta founded the 393,000-square-foot facility Ocala Operations in 1970. Lockheed Martin now employs approximately 950 employees in the Ocala facility, who manufacture assemblies for numerous Lockheed Martin products, including sensors for aircraft fire control systems, missile and vehicle electronic and cabling assemblies, and missile seeker and guidance sections.

Martin Company opens its first plant in Orlando

1957

The Martin Company’s Orlando plant was built in 1957 in anticipation of increased activity at the rocket launch site at Cape Canaveral on the Florida coast. It was there that a far-reaching and influential program was developed that affected not only America’s space program, but nearly every quality control program in the world.